U.S. Pay Transparency Laws by State and Locality

U.S. Pay Transparency Laws by State and Locality

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In an effort to advance pay equity, a growing number of states and localities have enacted pay transparency laws. These laws typically require employers to share the pay range for a position with applicants – either in the job posting or during the interview and hiring process – and in some cases also give current employees the right to learn the pay range for their role.

The charts below provide a snapshot of current enacted and proposed pay transparency laws in U.S. states and localities.

Updated: January 17, 2024

Enacted Laws

The following states and localities have a pay transparency law that has been signed into law.

JurisdictionCovered EmployersPay Range
Required
in Job Postings?
Requirements
CaliforniaEmployers with 15 or more employeesYes· Include pay range in any job posting and provide to an applicant upon reasonable request
· Provide pay range for employee’s current position upon request
ColoradoEmployers with at least one employee in ColoradoYes·  Include pay range in any job posting, along with a general description of benefits and other compensation
·  List the date a job application window is expected to close
·  Inform all employees of internal job opportunities on the same day and prior to making a selection decision
·  Share information about selected candidates and how employees may express interest in similar roles within 30 days of the new hire’s start date
·  Share details about regular career progression paths, and associated pay and benefits for each step, with eligible employees
ConnecticutAll employers in Connecticut with at least one employeeNo·  Disclose pay range to an applicant upon request or before making an offer of compensation, whichever is earlier
District of Columbia
(Effective June 30, 2024, unless blocked during congressional review period)
All employers with at least one employee in the District of Columbia, except for the DC and federal governmentsYes·  Include minimum and maximum projected salary or hourly pay in all postings advertising a job, promotion or transfer opportunity
·  Disclose the existence of healthcare benefits to prospective employees before the first interview
·  Post a notice in the workplace informing employees of their rights under the pay transparency law
HawaiiEmployers with 50 or more employeesYes·  Include an hourly rate or salary range that reasonably reflects expected compensation in job listings

Note: Internal job postings for promotions or transfers are excluded and need not include a pay range.
Illinois
(Effective January 1, 2025)
Job posting requirements: Employers with 15 or more employees

Other requirements:
All employers
Yes·  Include a pay scale and benefits description in any posting for a specific position (employers with 15+ employees only)
·  Announce, post or otherwise notify current employees of promotion opportunities within 14 days of making an external job posting for the position
·  Inform applicants of the pay scale and benefits for a position upon request and prior to discussing compensation, if a public or internal posting with the information has not been made available
MarylandAll employers in MarylandNo·  Provide job applicants with the pay range for the position for which the individual applied
NevadaAll employers in NevadaNo·  Provide job applicants who have completed an interview (including for a promotion or transfer) with pay range for the position
New Jersey – Jersey CityEmployers with at least five employees within Jersey CityYes·  Include pay range in any ad for a job, promotion or transfer opportunity
New YorkEmployers with four or more employeesYes·  Include pay range and job description in any ad for a job, promotion or transfer opportunity performed at least partly in New York or reporting to a New York-based office, supervisor or other work site
New York – Albany CountyEmployers with four or more employeesYes·  Include pay range in any ad for a job, promotion or transfer opportunity
New York – IthacaEmployers with four or more employees whose standard work locations are in the city of IthacaYes·  Include pay range in any ad for a job, promotion or transfer opportunity
New York – New York CityEmployers with four or more employeesYes·  Include pay range in any ad for a job, promotion or transfer opportunity that can or will be performed at least partly in New York City
New York – Westchester CountyEmployers with four or more employeesYes·  Include pay range in any ad for a job, promotion or transfer opportunity required to be performed at least partly in Westchester County
Ohio – CincinnatiEmployers with 15 or more employeesNo·  Provide pay range to applicants who have received a conditional job offer upon reasonable request
Ohio – ToledoEmployers with 15 or more employeesNo·  Provide pay range to applicants who have received a conditional job offer upon reasonable request
Rhode IslandAll employers in Rhode IslandNo·  Provide applicant with pay range for the position to which they have applied, upon request and before discussing compensation
·  Provide employees with a pay range for the employee’s position at time of hire, upon request and when the employee moves into a new position
WashingtonEmployers with 15 or more employeesYes·  Include pay range and general description of benefits and other compensation in any job posting
·  Provide pay range upon request to an employee offered an internal transfer or promotion
As of January 17, 2024, there are 18 jurisdictions in the United States where pay transparency laws have been enacted.

Proposed Laws

Pay transparency legislation has been proposed in the following jurisdictions

JurisdictionProposed Pay Transparency Law
IndianaH.B. 1046 would require employers to include a pay range in each posting for a job, promotion or transfer opportunity and provide employees with the pay range for their role upon hire, transfer, promotion and the employee’s request.
MaineH.B. 583 would require employers with 10 or more employees to include a pay range in job postings; smaller employers would be required to disclose a pay range to an applicant upon request. All employers would be required to disclose a pay range for a current employee’s position to that employee upon request.
MarylandS.B. 525 / H.B. 649 would require employers in Maryland to include a pay range in each internal and external job posting.
MassachusettsH.B. 4109 would require employers with 25 or more employees in Massachusetts to include a pay range in job postings and disclose the pay range for a specific position upon request to an applicant seeking the position or a current employee holding the position. Employers would also be required to disclose a pay range to an employee offered a promotion or transfer to a new position with different responsibilities.
MichiganS.B. 142 would require employers with more than five employees to create a job description for each role that includes salary information and share the job description with an applicant during the recruiting process and with an employee upon request.
MinnesotaH.F. 3587 would require employers with 30 or more employees to include a salary range and a general description of the benefits offered for a role in any job posting.
PennsylvaniaS.B. 601 would require employers with 15 or more employees to provide a pay range to applicants and candidates for internal transfers and promotions. Employers would also be required to provide employees with a the pay range for their role upon hire and annually thereafter.
VermontH.B. 116 would require employers to disclose the pay scale for a position to applicants and current employees, submit compensation data broken down by gender and race to the state Department of Labor annually, and add race and gender identity as protected characteristics under the state’s wage discrimination law.
VirginiaS.B. 370 would prohibit employers from inquiring into an applicant’s salary history and require employers to include a pay range in each internal or external job posting.
West VirginiaH.B. 4272 would require employers to provide a pay range and description of benefits and other compensation to an applicant upon request and prohibit employers from inquiring into an applicant’s salary history.
WisconsinA.B. 905 would require employers to include a pay range and description of benefits in any job listing.
Note that while this list is updated frequently and we make every effort to identify and track all relevant legislation, it may not be entirely exhaustive.

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